Product design principles that will improve usability for everyone.

An abstract image with a black outline on a white background showing Tetris-like shapes moving towards each other
An abstract image with a black outline on a white background showing Tetris-like shapes moving towards each other
All illustrations by Aizhan Abdrakhmanova

How often do we use websites while being in a quiet, empty room with no distractions and plenty of time to browse around? In the digital world, where everything is competing for our attention, it’s easy to get distracted. Cognitive overload, the term created in the context of education to describe that every brain has a limited capacity, is something most of us experience in our daily life.

But there is one group that experiences this on a much larger scale — autistic people. This group accounts for approximately 1% of the global population and prefers to do most activities…


Best design practices for autistic people in 9 key categories including layout, content, colours, interactions, navigation and more.

Abstract Tetris-like shapes with brown-pink gradient moving towards each other.
Abstract Tetris-like shapes with brown-pink gradient moving towards each other.
Illustration by Aizhan Abdrakhmanova

Following my interview with Victoria about an ideal online experience for an autistic person, I immersed myself in research about designing for autistic people to find best practices. I have summarised my findings below into categories, with links to sources if you want to learn more. In a follow-up article, I will then distil my findings into an easy to follow design guide.

Many of the research projects I found that focused on designing for autistic people had contradictory outcomes. This could be because most of the available research was conducted with children. …


First-hand feedback on online products to help you make digital experiences inclusive and accessible by the autistic community.

This year's global events have accelerated our dependency on technology, but also highlighted the urgency of making it inclusive. For several months many of us had to rely on digital services to provide the essentials. The process of adoption was easier for some than others. Unfortunately, many realised that the majority of digital products were not made for them.

This is the first interview in my series ‘Inclusive by Design’ where I’d like to amplify the voices of underrepresented communities, learn from their perspective of digital experiences first hand and explore the ways that design and tech can become truly…

Irina Rusakova

Inclusive design and research consultant passionate about human diversity and innovation. Author of @Inclusive_By_Design project.

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